…And There Was A Fire Near The Dome Of The Rock, Too…


GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
May 1, 2019

One of this website’s regular readers sent along this article, and in case you hadn’t yet heard about it, I decided I needed to blog about it. On the same day that Notre Dame de Paris was burning, there was also a fire at the al-Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem.

That’s near the Dome of the Rock, folks:

Jerusalem’s Al-Aqsa Mosque Fire Burns at the Same Time As Flames Engulf Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris

Like Notre Dame, the Dome of the Rock is, architecturally, a beautiful and sublime building, and like Notre Dame is for the Christian world, the site is one of the most revered  in the Islamic world…

… and it was burning not only on the same day as Notre Dame, but at the same time:

A fire broke out at the revered Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in Jerusalem just as flames ravaged the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris.

Footage showing smoke and fire emerging from the roof of a structure known as the Marwani Prayer Room, or Solomon’s Stables, could be seen on social media. The Palestine News Agency, the official outlet of the Palestinian National Authority, cited a guard as saying Monday that “the fire broke out in the guard’s room outside the roof of the Marwani Prayer Room, and the fire brigade of the Islamic Waqf handled the matter successfully.”

No injuries or damage was reported during the short blaze.

News of the incident at the Al-Aqsa Mosque, the third holiest site in Islam and central to the ongoing Arab-Israeli conflict, was largely overshadowed by a much larger blaze engulfing the Notre Dame Cathedral at the same time. There was no evidence of any link between the two fires.

The Marwani Prayer Room is located underneath the southeastern corner of the Temple Mount, known to Muslims as Haram al-Sharif, which contains both the Dome of the Rock and Al-Aqsa Mosque. Sheikh Azzam al-Khatib, director general of the Jerusalem Waqf and Al-Aqsa Mosque Affairs Department, told Jordan’s Al-Mamlaka TV that the fire broke out in the courtyard and preliminary information suggested that it may have been caused by children tampering in the area. (Emphasis added)

Ok… I admit it: as soon as I read this story, I wasn’t buying, and I’m still not buying, and one reason I’m still not buying is that there hasn’t been much else coming out about this story. But consider just two points from this article: (1) the fire was reported by an actual guard at the site as having broken out “in the guard’s room outside the Marwani Prayer room,” but then we are told that the director general of the site stated that (2) the fire “broke out in the courtyard” and (3) that is may have been caused by children tampering in the area,” in other words, it was all a childish prank of some sort, gone horribly wrong, or an accident of play that got out of hand.

There’s so much here that sends my suspicion meter straight into the red zone that I don’t even know where to begin, but I suppose we could begin with that business about “children tampering in the area.” I’m calling hogwash on that one, for what set of parents – or for that matter, the children themselves – are going to think that a fun prank would be to set fire near the mosque? For Christian or Jewish children, one can’t imagine parents raising their children to think it’s ok to play pranks at the mosque, and for Muslim children it would be similarly – though for very different reasons – unthinkable.

But then there’s the outright contradiction of where the fire started: was it outside in the courtyard, or inside in the guards’ room? What strikes me here is that we have “an official story” (it started in the courtyard) versus an actual witness’s story which contradicts the official story, in this case, the witness being a guard, who said it started in the guard room. That I can wrap my head around, for if the intention was to severely damage the mosque, getting rid of the “first responders” would seem to be a logical step.

But above all it’s the timing here that bothers me. Certainly a fire at Notre Dame and a fire at the Al-Aqsa mosque can happen “coincidentally” and “accidentally.” But it’s when one considers the emerging details and contradictions in the narrative that inevitably send the suspicion meter into the red zone, that the possibility that both fires were deliberate acts begins to take on a horrifying possibility.

The only difference between the two events is that the mosque fire was put out fairly quickly, and before serious damage could be done, otherwise we might have some globaloneyist proposing to rebuild it as some modernist “inclusive” monstrosity.

The bottom line for me here, and I don’t know about you, is that there is much more to this story… it’s like a mackerel on a moonlit beach: it both shines and stinks, not the least because of the contradictions in what is known, as well as for the fact that not much more is known.

Time will tell, but I suspect this story, too, will not go away. I”m just not buying the “coincidence” story.

See you on the flip side…

Read More At: GizaDeathStar.com

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About The Author:

Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

#Book Review: Cultural Literacy – What Every American Needs To Know by E.D. Hirsch, Jr | #SmartReads | #Culture | #Education


BreakawayIndividual.com
Zy Marquiez
April 17, 2019

Cultural Literacy by E.D. Hirsch is a sobering look into some of the reasons why public schooling in America has been spiraling downwards for the last few decades.  At the vanguard of these issues, Hirsch narrows down this intellectual death spiral to the loss of cultural literacy among the masses.  This loss of cultural literacy has exacerbated the significant decline in public schooling in America.

Moreover, Hirsch makes it a point to show that cultural literacy is not just knowing about significant facts, or information as some would undoubtedly think.  Certainly, these are at times important, but more precisely, the author homes-in on the fact that cultural literacy is information shared by individuals within a particular social strata that makes their communications more efficient and enjoyable, thus allowing for a more cohesive social strata – creating a stronger culture.

With a critical eye, Hirsch notes:

“….literacy requires the early and continued transmission of specific information…Only by accumulating shared symbols, and the shared information that the symbols represent, can we learn to communicate effectively with one another in our national community.”[1][Bold Emphasis Added].

Employing copious amounts of research, Hirsch shows there should be a significant cause for concern about the poor quality of education, as well as other salient problems.

With deep concern, Hirsch soberingly warns:

“If we not achieve a literate society, the technicians, with their arcane specialties, will not be able to communicate with us nor we with them.  That would contradict the basic principles of democracy and must not be allowed to happen.”[2][Bold Emphasis Added].

Such an instance would fracture the populace, something that would only feed the divide and conquer left-right paradigm.

A sound and versatile education is impossible without a robust and culturally literate repertoire.  This deliberate shattering of an individual’s foundational education principles is causing the current catastrophic decline in education .  This is why the information touched upon by Hirsch is so pivotal and should be ruminated upon.

To home in on the point of deteriorating education, let’s take a gander at what two-time award winning teacher, researcher and writer, John Taylor Gatto stated in A Different Kind Of Teacher:

““Schools were designed by Horace Mann, E.L. Thorndike, and others to be instruments of scientific management of a mass population.  Schools are intended to produce, through the application of formulas, formulaic beings whose behavior can be predicted and controlled.  To a very great extent, schools succeed in doing this.”[3][Bold Emphasis Added]

Lowering cultural literacy, among other things, would undoubtedly be part of this process.  This is because culturally literate individuals will be familiar with the scaffolding of history and many of its nuances; such individuals are magnitudes harder to control, which is why public schooling through the Common Core system seeks to conform everyone through standardized testing and more.

We are at a turning point in history, and we either stop the descent into cultural nescience, individually, and as a nation, or we continue into the swamp of ignorance.

Irrespective of the circumstances, one thing is certain: there is still time to make significant changes if individuals choose to.  It is really up to individuals and their families to educate themselves, because the way the system is constructed, a well-rounded and complete education cannot take place within the system.  This is one of many reasons why self-directed learning is growing at an immense rate, and will continue to do so.  Don’t allow yourself, or those you know to fall by the wayside merely because the system is corrupt and cares not for true education but rather to instead create cogs for the machine.

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Sources:

[1] E.D. Hirsch, Jr., What Every American Needs To Know, p. xvii.
[2] Ibid., p. 2.
[3] John Taylor Gatto, A Different Kind Of Teacher, p. 16.

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Suggested Reading & Watching:

What Is The Difference Between Education & Public Schooling?
Logical Fallacies Employed In Every Day Life
13 Great Reasons To Study Logic
How A Generation Lost Its Culture – by Professor Patrick Deneen
A Different Kind Of Teacher by John Taylor Gatto
Socratic Logic by Peter Kreeft Ph.D.
Philosophy 101 by Peter Kreeft Ph.D.
What Is Education?  The Elite Curriculum – John Taylor Gatto
Breakaway Guide To Censorship, Disinformation, Logical Fallacies & More
How To Read A Book by Mortimer J. Adler and Charles Van Doren
Classrooms Of The Heart [Documentary] – John Taylor Gatto
Social Engineering 101
The True Purpose Of Modern Schooling
Getting Things Done by David Allen
Open-Source Method: Genius Education – Examples | John Taylor Gatto
The Trivium – The Liberal Arts Of Logic, Grammar & Rhetoric by Sister Miriam Joseph Ph.D.
A Rulebook For Arguments by Anthony Weston
A Workbook For Arguments by David R. Morrow & Anthony Wesson
Drilling Through The Core – Why Common Core Is Bad For American Education by Sandra Stotsky & Contributors

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If you find value in this information, please share it.  This article is free and open source.  All individuals have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Zy Marquiez and  BreakawayIndividual.com

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About The Author:

Zy Marquiez is an avid book reviewer, inquirer, an open-minded skeptic, yogi, and freelance writer who aims at empowering individuals while also studying and regularly mirroring subjects like Consciousness, Education, Creativity, The Individual, Ancient History & Ancient Civilizations, Forbidden Archaeology, Big Pharma, Alternative Health, Space, Geoengineering, Social Engineering, Propaganda, and much more.

Notre Dame And St. Sulpice Fires


Source: GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
April 17, 2019

I woke up today (Monday) fully intending to blog about something else, but a friend had sent me a message on Facebook about the spire of Notre Dame de Paris collapsing because of a fire. Stunned, I did a quick search and saw a picture, and sure enough, the cathedral was on fire, the roof gone, the spire gone. What will remain, essentially, is the shell of a building, if that.  In one day, a cathedral that has been the landmark in Paris for over 850 years, is gone, and I lack the words to express what I am feeling, and I suspect that pales to what the French and Parisians are feeling. In its way, Notre Dame, situated as it is – or was – on its island in the Seine, was a kind of icon of the whole idea of the Ile-de-France, the “island of France,” the political and cultural heart of the nation. Just a few days ago, there was another fire in another famous Parisian church, St. Sulpice de Paris, though this did not, so far as I know, destroy that church, famous for being the home of the largest Cavaille-Coll church organ in France, and the instrument that Charles-Marie Widor presided at for over sixty years.  Apparently, everything in Notre Dame is destroyed – the art, the fixtures, its own Cavaille-Coll organ… everything. It is doubly sad because this fire broke out and destroyed the landmark cathedral at the start of Holy Week in the western churches.  According to some reports as I write this, they were able to rescue some of the relics, art work, and the reserved sacrament. Everything else is gone.

Notre Dame is iconic, as iconic as the churches and cathedrals of Chartres, Reims, or Cologne.

The earliest reports about the fire indicate that it was started by accident, due to renovation work that was being done, but it is unclear exactly how. The same was said of the fire just a few days ago that broke out in St. Sulpice. As I write, the Paris prosecutor has promised an investigation, which, of course, is normal under such circumstances, but it does raise questions, and if there is foul play involved, I suspect that we’ll never know the whole story. But there is a story here, and it’s this:

Twelve French Churches Attacked, Vandalized in One Week

The symbolism, and timing, are what most compel about the images of the burning cathedral; in a way, I cannot help think of it as an icon of what is happening to Europe, and the West in general, as the leadership of the West, and many people, not only are intent upon turning their backs upon one of the things that made western civilization what it is, but actually destroying it altogether. Like many I cannot help but entertain the suspicion that if one wanted to strike a symbolic blow not just against France, but western civilization itself, one could not choose a more appropriate structure than Notre Dame. But deliberate or accident, the symbolism remains, and as saddened as I am about it, and as saddened as no doubt many people in France and around the world are about it, one can rest assured that there are some who, in the black void of their hearts, are rejoicing.

For many years I’ve been saying “own the culture,” and if there is a message in this event, it’s perhaps as simple as “use it, or lose it,” guard your traditions, or watch them be consumed. What will rise from the ashes of Notre Dame? Will it be another cathedral, done in reverence to that tradition that built it in the first place? Or will it be some modernist monstrosity of a monument with a bronze plaque commemorating a “world historical site” and the vapid and empty cliches that always accompany such things.

Time will tell of course, but if there is anything to take away from this, I suspect it is this: we have been warned.

Tomorrow (Tuesday), there will be no blog. It would seem inappropriate as the churches of France are being vandalized in the most barbarous fashion, by people who, as I say, have empty, black hearts.

Read More At: GizaDeathStar.com
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[Editor’s Note]

I’ve been highly suspicious about the fire from the get go, especially given all the attacks on churches in France.  It wouldn’t surprise me if more information came later on that helped show cracks in the official story.  Either way, it’s a huge loss for culture and humanity as a whole.

More importantly, I would bet everything that if what’s discussed above isn’t an accident, then an overarching pattern will emerge in the future of ‘accidents’ in which symbolic Western Cultures go up in smoke.  Time will tell, but put that one in your back pocket and see if it manifests, just in case.
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About Joseph P. Farrell

Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

#Book Review: Confucius – The Analects by Raymond Dawson | #SmartReads | #Philosophy


BreakawayIndividual.com
Zy Marquiez
April 11, 2019

Confucius – The Analects is a rather intriguing book since it aims to tackle information regarding the well known Confucius in a cogent manner.

The book is laid out in a fairly straight forward approach with no frills that’s an extremely quick read.

Within the introductory section, there is some background material featured, while later on the book features notes on particular translations the book offers.  Knowing how complex translations can be, it’s a well-thought out approach to delineate what the book means by each translated term, instead of assuming that the reader will know.  Not only that, certain words have various meanings, so to be able to narrow down with precision what was stated is greatly appreciated.

For individuals seeking veritable gems of Confucius, this book has dozens of them.

Reading this book will certainly help the individual realize how the culture was at the time, and why the information presented here was so vital to the upbringing and society in ancient China.

The totality of the book is seamlessly interwoven to give you everything you need for comprehension, while not an iota more.

Taking all into account the book definitely belongs in the libraries of individuals who value such knowledge with resounding depth.  Confucius was definitely a master of his craft, and this book exemplifies that quite trenchantly.

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Suggested Reading & Viewing:

The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri
Paradise Lost by John Milton
The Complete Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
Exploring J.R.R. Tokien’s The Hobbit by Corey Olsen Ph.D.
The Philosophy Of Tolkien – The Worldview Behind Lord Of The Rings by Peter Kreeft Ph.D.
On The Shoulders Of Hobbits – The Road To Virtue By Tolkien & Lewis by Louis Marko Ph.D.
Lord Of The Rings: How To Read J.R.R. Tolkien [Presentation]
The Vision Of Freedom That Tolkien Got & The West Forgot [Video]
Socrates Meets Kant by Peter Kreeft Ph.D.

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If you find value in this information, feel free to share it.  This article is free and open source.  All individuals have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Zy Marquiez and  BreakawayIndividual.com

___________________________________________________________
About The Author:

Zy Marquiez is an avid book reviewer, inquirer, an open-minded skeptic, yogi, and freelance writer who aims at empowering individuals while also studying and regularly mirroring subjects like Consciousness, Education, Creativity, The Individual, Ancient History & Ancient Civilizations, Forbidden Archaeology, Big Pharma, Alternative Health, Space, Geoengineering, Social Engineering, Propaganda, and much more.

How A Generation Lost Its Common Culture by Professor Patrick Deneen

Professor Patrick Deneen speaks at length as to the myriad reasons why the culture is declining and what type of transformation is taking place in society.

If there’s one thing you read today, let it be this, for the concerns shared by Professor Deneen do not only seep into our present state, but will echo into the future, whether we like it or not.

Culture
Source: MindingTheCampus.org
Professor Patrick Deneen
March 26, 2019

My students are know-nothings. They are exceedingly nice, pleasant, trustworthy, mostly honest, well-intentioned, and utterly decent. But their brains are largely empty, devoid of any substantial knowledge that might be the fruits of an education in an inheritance and a gift of a previous generation. They are the culmination of western civilization, a civilization that has forgotten nearly everything about itself, and as a result, has achieved near-perfect indifference to its own culture.

It’s difficult to gain admissions to the schools where I’ve taught – Princeton, Georgetown, and now Notre Dame. Students at these institutions have done what has been demanded of them:  they are superb test-takers, they know exactly what is needed to get an A in every class (meaning that they rarely allow themselves to become passionate and invested in any one subject); they build superb resumes. They are respectful and cordial to their elders, though easy-going if crude with their peers. They respect diversity (without having the slightest clue what diversity is) and they are experts in the arts of non-judgmentalism (at least publically). They are the cream of their generation, the masters of the universe, a generation-in-waiting to run America and the world.

But ask them some basic questions about the civilization they will be inheriting, and be prepared for averted eyes and somewhat panicked looks. Who fought in the Peloponnesian War? Who taught Plato, and whom did Plato teach? How did Socrates die? Raise your hand if you have read both the Iliad and the Odyssey. The Canterbury Tales? Paradise Lost? The Inferno?

Who was Saul of Tarsus? What were the 95 theses, who wrote them, and what was their effect? Why does the Magna Carta matter? How and where did Thomas Becket die? Who was Guy Fawkes, and why is there a day named after him? What did Lincoln say in his Second Inaugural? His first Inaugural? How about his third Inaugural?  What are the Federalist Papers?

Some students, due most often to serendipitous class choices or a quirky old-fashioned teacher, might know a few of these answers. But most students have not been educated to know them. At best, they possess accidental knowledge, but otherwise are masters of systematic ignorance. It is not their “fault” for pervasive ignorance of western and American history, civilization, politics, art and literature. They have learned exactly what we have asked of them – to be like mayflies, alive by happenstance in a fleeting present.

Our students’ ignorance is not a failing of the educational system – it is its crowning achievement. Efforts by several generations of philosophers and reformers and public policy experts — whom our students (and most of us) know nothing about — have combined to produce a generation of know-nothings. The pervasive ignorance of our students is not a mere accident or unfortunate but correctible outcome, if only we hire better teachers or tweak the reading lists in high school. It is the consequence of a civilizational commitment to civilizational suicide. The end of history for our students signals the End of History for the West.

During my lifetime, lamentation over student ignorance has been sounded by the likes of E.D. Hirsch, Allan Bloom, Mark Bauerlein and Jay Leno, among many others. But these lamentations have been leavened with the hope that appeal to our and their better angels might reverse the trend (that’s an allusion to Lincoln’s first inaugural address, by the way). E.D. Hirsch even worked up a self-help curriculum, a do-it yourself guide on how to become culturally literate, imbued with the can-do American spirit that cultural defenestration could be reversed by a good reading list in the appendix. Broadly missing is sufficient appreciation that this ignorance is the intended consequence of our educational system, a sign of its robust health and success.

We have fallen into the bad and unquestioned habit of thinking that our educational system is broken, but it is working on all cylinders. What our educational system aims to produce is cultural amnesia, a wholesale lack of curiosity, history-less free agents, and educational goals composed of content-free processes and unexamined buzz-words like “critical thinking,” “diversity,” “ways of knowing,” “social justice,” and “cultural competence.”

Our students are the achievement of a systemic commitment to producing individuals without a past for whom the future is a foreign country, cultureless ciphers who can live anywhere and perform any kind of work without inquiring about its purposes or ends, perfected tools for an economic system that prizes “flexibility” (geographic, interpersonal, ethical).

In such a world, possessing a culture, a history, an inheritance, a commitment to a place and particular people, specific forms of gratitude and indebtedness (rather than a generalized and deracinated commitment to “social justice”), a strong set of ethical and moral norms that assert definite limits to what one ought and ought not to do (aside from being “judgmental”) are hindrances and handicaps.

Regardless of major or course of study, the main object of modern education is to sand off remnants of any cultural or historical specificity and identity that might still stick to our students, to make them perfect company men and women for a modern polity and economy that penalizes deep commitments. Efforts first to foster appreciation for “multi-culturalism” signaled a dedication to eviscerate any particular cultural inheritance, while the current fad of “diversity” signals thoroughgoing commitment to de-cultured and relentless homogenization.

We Must Know…What?

Above all, the one overarching lesson that students receive is the true end of education: the only essential knowledge is that know ourselves to be radically autonomous selves within a comprehensive global system with a common commitment to mutual indifference. Our commitment to mutual indifference is what binds us together as a global people. Any remnant of a common culture would interfere with this prime directive:  a common culture would imply that we share something thicker, an inheritance that we did not create, and a set of commitments that imply limits and particular devotions.

Ancient philosophy and practice praised as an excellent form of government a res publica – a devotion to public things, things we share together. We have instead created the world’s first Res Idiotica – from the Greek word idiotes, meaning “private individual.” Our education system produces solipsistic, self-contained selves whose only public commitment is an absence of commitment to a public, a common culture, a shared history. They are perfectly hollowed vessels, receptive and obedient, without any real obligations or devotions.

They won’t fight against anyone, because that’s not seemly, but they won’t fight for anyone or anything either. They are living in a perpetual Truman Show, a world constructed yesterday that is nothing more than a set for their solipsism, without any history or trajectory.

I love my students – like any human being, each has enormous potential and great gifts to bestow upon the world. But I weep for them, for what is rightfully theirs but hasn’t been given. On our best days, I discern their longing and anguish and I know that their innate human desire to know who they are, where they have come from, where they ought to go, and how they ought to live will always reassert itself. But even on those better days, I can’t help but hold the hopeful thought that the world they have inherited – a world without inheritance, without past, future, or deepest cares – is about to come tumbling down, and that this collapse would be the true beginning of a real education.


Patrick Deneen is David A. Potenziani Memorial Associate Professor of Constitutional Studies at Notre Dame.
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Suggested Reading & Watching:

Logical Fallacies Employed In Every Day Life
13 Great Reasons To Study Logic
How A Generation Lost Its Culture – by Professor Patrick Deneen
Socratic Logic by Peter Kreeft Ph.D.
Philosophy 101 by Peter Kreeft Ph.D.
What Is Education?  The Elite Curriculum – John Taylor Gatto
How To Read A Book by Mortimer J. Adler and Charles Van Doren
Social Engineering 101
Getting Things Done by David Allen
Open-Source Method: Genius Education – Examples | John Taylor Gatto
The Trivium – The Liberal Arts Of Logic, Grammar & Rhetoric by Sister Miriam Joseph Ph.D.
A Rulebook For Arguments by Anthony Weston
A Workbook For Arguments by David R. Morrow & Anthony Wesson