#Book Review: Emotions Revealed – Recognizing Faces & Feelings To Improve Communications & Emotional Life by Paul Ekman | #SmartReads | #BookReview | #SocialEngineering


BreakawayIndividual.com
July 12, 2019
Zy Marquiez

Paul Ekman, who is also author of the landmark book Unmasking The Face – A Guide To Recognizing Emotions From Facial Expression, has been at the tip of the spear in regards to the subject matter of emotions and behavioral psychology.

In Emotions Revealed – Recognizing Faces & Feelings To Improve Communications & Emotional Life, Ekman speaks at length throughout the book about the extensive research he has conducted throughout his life in respect to the emotional behaviour individuals display.  This book also offers ways of ascertaining whether those individuals are carrying out deceit or not.

The book Emotions Revealed couples extremely well with Unmasking The Face because whereas the former provides ample emotional data for reading and understanding individual behavior, the latter offers dozens of concrete visual examples of these emotions – happiness, surprise, fear, anger, disgust and sadness.

In Emotions Revealed, Ekman helps individual glean information in a manner that is reasonable and easy to follow with the photographs used and the exercises to carry out, which help individuals attain a deeper understanding of others in general.  Moreover, this book allows individuals to seep into the possible mindset someone else might employ during heightened emotional states and allows for deeper comprehension of the circumstance and emotions.  For me personally, this was significant given my passion in understanding other people, especially when trying to possibly mend bridges with people from all social strata, particular those closest to me.

The author states in the preface to the second edition that his goal is to ‘help people improve four essential skills’, which are:

(1) Becoming more consciously aware of when you are becoming emotional, even before you speak or act.

(2) Choosing how you behave when you are emotional, so you achieve your goals without damaging other people.

(3) Becoming more sensitive to how others are feeling, which is something I struggle with at times, which is one reason for me attaining a deeper understanding of the subject matter.

(4) Carefully using the information you acquire about how others are feeling.

Knowing the goals the author had in the beginning of the book, it can be said without equivocation that the author did a trenchant job at fulfilling his goal.

Not only did Ekman provide individuals with extensive data that merges with his central goals, but he also carries it out in a clear and direct manner.

This book is indispensable in the field of emotions and behavior and it is an essential tool to understanding how people behave.

Given all this, I plan on referencing this book quite often, and I hope you all do as well.

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Suggested Reading & Watching:

The Tavistock Institute: Social Engineering The Masses by Daniel Estulin
Social Engineering 101
Invisible Influence by Kevin Hogan
Lessons From Orwell’s 1984
Unmasking The Face by Paul Eckman
What Is The Difference Between Education & Public Schooling?
The Catastrophic Decline Of Public Education: 21 Facts About Why Public Schooling Performs So Poorly
What Our List Of Most Banned Books Says About Our Society’s Fears
Logical Fallacies Employed In Every Day Life
Dumbing Us Down by John Taylor Gatto
Weapons Of Mass Instruction by John Taylor Gatto
13 Great Reasons To Study Logic
How A Generation Lost Its Culture – by Professor Patrick Deneen
A Different Kind Of Teacher by John Taylor Gatto
Socratic Logic by Peter Kreeft Ph.D.
Philosophy 101 by Peter Kreeft Ph.D.
Brave New World & Brave New World Revisited by Aldous Huxley
What Is Education?  The Elite Curriculum – John Taylor Gatto
Astroturfing & Manipulation Of Media Messages – Sharyl Attkisson
Breakaway Guide To Censorship, Disinformation, Logical Fallacies & More
How To Read A Book by Mortimer J. Adler and Charles Van Doren
History So It Doesn’t Repeat – The Deliberate Dumbing Down Of America With Charlotte Iserbyt
Classrooms Of The Heart [Documentary] – John Taylor Gatto
Sumerhill School – A New View On Childhood by A.S. Neil
Dialectical Thinking – Zeno, Socrates, Kant, Marx by Tommi Juhani Hanjijarvi Ph.D.
Underground History Of American Education With John Taylor Gatto
The True Purpose Of Modern Schooling
Getting Things Done by David Allen
Open-Source Method: Genius Education – Examples | John Taylor Gatto
The Trivium – The Liberal Arts Of Logic, Grammar & Rhetoric by Sister Miriam Joseph Ph.D.
Cultural Literacy – What Every American Needs To Know
by E.D. Hirsch Jr.
A Rulebook For Arguments by Anthony Weston
A Workbook For Arguments by David R. Morrow & Anthony Wesson
Drilling Through The Core – Why Common Core Is Bad For American Education by Sandra Stotsky & Contributors

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About The Author:

Zy Marquiez is an avid book reviewer, inquirer, an open-minded skeptic, yogi, and freelance writer who aims at empowering individuals while also studying and regularly mirroring subjects like Consciousness, Education, Creativity, The Individual, Ancient History & Ancient Civilizations, Forbidden Archaeology, Big Pharma, Alternative Health, Space, Geoengineering, Social Engineering, Propaganda, and much more.

3D Printing Scrapbook: The First Human Heart 3D Printed


GizaDeathStar.com
Dr. Joseph P. Farrell
May 4th, 2019

If you’ve been following the three-d printing/additive manufacturing story, and the genetic engineering story, you’ll be interested in this one. Frankly, I view it with a mixture of ambivalence, as being something that could be profoundly good, and profoundly bad. The story, as you can guess from the headline, is about the fact that some scientists have now 3-d printed the first artificial human heart. But there’s a catch here, and it’s a profound one, in this article shared by V.T.:

Major Medical Breakthrough: 3D Heart Printed Using Patient’s Own Cells and Materials

The engineered heart completely matches the immunological, cellular, biochemical and anatomical properties of the patient

In a major medical breakthrough, Tel Aviv University researchers have “printed” the world’s first 3D vascularised engineered heart using a patient’s own cells and biological materials. Their findings were published on April 15 in a study in Advanced Science.

Until now, scientists in regenerative medicine — a field positioned at the crossroads of biology and technology — have been successful in printing only simple tissues without blood vessels.

I was struck by the fact that apparently, no babies were aborted, ground up, and fetal stem cell tissue harvested to accomplish the feat, which seems all but par for the course for similar developments elsewhere in the world. And the utility of the accomplishment, using a patient’s own cells, is rather obvious, as the article points out:

For the research, a biopsy of fatty tissue was taken from patients. The cellular and a-cellular materials of the tissue were then separated. While the cells were reprogrammed to become pluripotent stem cells, the extracellular matrix (ECM), a three-dimensional network of extracellular macromolecules such as collagen and glycoproteins, were processed into a personalized hydrogel that served as the printing “ink.”

After being mixed with the hydrogel, the cells were efficiently differentiated to cardiac or endothelial cells to create patient-specific, immune-compatible cardiac patches with blood vessels and, subsequently, an entire heart.

According to Prof. Dvir, the use of “native” patient-specific materials is crucial to successfully engineering tissues and organs.

“The biocompatibility of engineered materials is crucial to eliminating the risk of implant rejection, which jeopardizes the success of such treatments,” Prof. Dvir says. “Ideally, the biomaterial should possess the same biochemical, mechanical and topographical properties of the patient’s own tissues. Here, we can report a simple approach to 3D-printed thick, vascularized and perfusable cardiac tissues that completely match the immunological, cellular, biochemical and anatomical properties of the patient.”

The researchers are now planning on culturing the printed hearts in the lab and “teaching them to behave” like hearts, Prof. Dvir says. They then plan to transplant the 3D-printed heart in animal models.

Of course, the implication here is obvious: if one can do this with hearts, one can do it for almost any organ in the body once they “wear out” and need replacement: “Maybe, in ten years,” the article concludes, “there will be organ printers in the finest hospitals around the world, and these procedures will be conducted routinely.”

Probably so. One can even envision a time or circumstance that the technology becomes so commonplace that the procedure becomes cheap, affordable, and can be done by “licensed organ printers” rather than doctors, in a kind of out patient procedure. And while we’re indulging in all this high octane speculation, one my even envision a kind of “organ dealership” or “Jiffy Lube,” a kind of drive-through organ replacement “garage,” complete with warranties and expiration dates, and so on.

Now, on the one hand, I can see that this developing technology is a good thing, because it extends life, and life is a good thing. Call me old fashioned, but I believe ardently in the sanctity of life. But it’s that, precisely, that also bothers me here, with the article’s own admission that one can envision a whole new branch of medicine emerging: organ-printing and replacement, and with it, a cheapening of life, a view that our bodies are so many collections of organs to be replaced when “worn out.” I wrote about this years ago, at the very end of my first “foray” into this strange alternative research field, in The Giza Death Star. I wrote about it in the context of a view of those ancient texts which record extraordinarily long life spans for our early ancestors. The biblical texts have humans living in some cases from half a millennium to almost a thousand years. In the Mesopotamian and Egyptian king’s lists, these life spans stretch tens of thousands and sometimes even hundreds of thousands of years.

And with the advent of this new “organ-printing and replacement” branch of medicine, once again modern science is providing a context from which to view those ancient claims as perhaps having a basis in a similar technological reality. But as I put it at the end of The Giza Death Star, the danger of viewing organs as so many replaceable “body parts” is what it does to the human spirit. As I warned then, the danger of becoming bored with life to the point of a kind of nihilistic anomie or antinomianism emerges, and one can imagine the emergence of a Hitler or a Stalin with thousands of years to perfect the evil in their souls. On can, of course, imagine a Francis of Assisi or Seraphim of Sarov perfecting their sanctity as well. It’s that potentiality that raises another high octane speculation: imagine also a “board” which must “approve” people to be recipients of such medical-technological boons. To be “approved,” one will have to have demonstrated holding the “correct opinions.” And given the fact that certain state legislatures are openly applauding the passage of full term abortion laws, and that certain state governors in this country are openly and calmly talking about “post-birth abortions” – infanticide – on television, one can fairly guess that people like Seraphim of Sarov or Francis of Assisi won’t be on the list of “acceptable recipients.”

See you on the flip side…

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About The Author:

Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and “strange stuff”. His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into “alternative history and science”.

Shattered Heart | #Poetry | #Poem | #Prose | #Love | #Family | #Darkness | #Writing | #Loss | #Quote | #Death


This ablation that my mind feels when it ends up scattering
Is desolation when my heart reels when I end up shattering

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Zy Marquiez | The Lightning Baron
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Suggested Poems:

Path Of Darkness, Path Of Light
Frightening Wonder
The Kraken
Swarming Fears
Whirlwind Of Darkness
The Great White Whale
Astounding Wonder
Frightening Storms
Ocean Of Frustration
The Morrow Knows
Inking Desolation
A Heart In Despair
Sea Dragon
Storm Of The 7 Seas
Days Go By
Zeus’ Fury
Grasping At Shadows
Words Are Like Swords
Skyquakes Asunder
The Sky Of Wonder Burnt Asunder
Dark Grays
Ghost Of Occlusion
Thunder Booms
Mist Of Dark Bliss
Frightening Forms
The Sparrow Chased The Morrow
Storm Of Worries
Onward Towards Rapture
Thunderbolts Of Fear
Aborn In Grays
Coping Deep Within
Tornado Of Fears
Wings Are Made To Fly
Daily Horror-Scope
Fraught With Despair
The Allure Of Purest Darkness
The Sky’s Laughter Is Blight
Locked Up
Despair